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MH370: Current underwater search area largely to complete next month - JACC

MH370: Current underwater search area largely to complete next month - JACC
Flight MH370 dropped off radar on March 8 last year as it flew from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 227 passengers and 12 crew on board. - File pic
KUALA LUMPUR: The current underwater search area for the missing Malaysia Airlines (MAS) flight MH370 in the remote area of the Indian Ocean may largely be completed in May.

The Australian Joint Agency Coordination Centre (JACC), which oversees the search operation, in a statement, pointed out that more than 60 percent of the area had been covered so far.

However, it said the target was made assuming that there would be no significant delays involving the vessels, equipment and the weather.

"Our work will continue to be thorough and methodical, so sometimes weekly progress may seem slow.
"Please be assured that work is continuing and is aimed at finding MH370 as quickly as possible," the statement said.

Meanwhile, JACC said Malaysia-Australia contracted vessel, Fugro Discovery was currently in the search area conducting underwater search operations, though experiencing a little 'hiccup' due to problems with the power supply through the cable to the towfish on the second day after arriving at the location.
"This issue was rectified and search operations resumed during the night of April 12," it said.

The GO Pheonix, and Fugro Equator, in the meantime, were expected to arrive tomorrow from the Port of Fremantle, JACC said.

Another vessel, Fugro Equator was expected to arrive on Friday (April 16) and if weather permits, the vessel would conduct calibration trials while transiting to the search area.

"Sea states in the priority search area are anticipated to range from two to six in the coming week. Remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Joalane may pass through the search area in the next couple of days," it added.

Flight MH370 dropped off radar on March 8 last year as it flew from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 227 passengers and 12 crew on board.

The Boeing 777 aircraft has yet to be found, even after an exhaustive search in the southern Indian Ocean where it is believed to have gone down after veering off course.

On Jan 29 this year, the Malaysian Department of Civil Aviation announced that the misfortune was an accident based on international aviation rules and that all 239 people on board were deemed to have lost their lives.