MB backs Johor Sultan's criticism of Dr Mahathir's 'racist politics'

MB backs Johor Sultan's criticism of Dr Mahathir's 'racist politics'
KHALED: So, he (Dr Mahathir) wanted to frighten and scare the Malays but the people of Johor do not accept racist elements. -Filepix
KLUANG: Menteri Besar Datuk Seri Mohamed Khaled Nordin stands firmly with Sultan of Johor, Sultan Ibrahim Almarhum Sultan Iskandar in taking Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad to task for trying to play politics by intimidating and bringing racism into China's investment in the state.

The menteri besar said there was truth to the sultan's statement and believed Dr Mahathir, a former prime minister, knew that some Malays did not like the presence of the Chinese.

"So, he (Dr Mahathir) wanted to frighten and scare the Malays but the people of Johor do not accept racist elements," he told reporters after his working visit to the Kluang parliamentary constituency here today.

He said this when commenting on a statement by the sultan who expressed disappointment and resentment towards Dr Mahathir's views on China's investment in the state.
In an interview with a local English daily recently, Sultan Ibrahim had also said that if such acts were allowed, it could alienate investors from investing in the country.

He criticised Dr Mahathir who was viewed as putting political interests above the interests of the people of Malaysia, especially Johor.

Meanwhile, Mohamed Khaled said the Singapore Government's decision to impose the Reciprocal Road Charge (RRC) of S$6.40 on all foreign-registered cars entering the republic, as of Feb 15, should be respected.

"We have to look at this matter in a positive light to encourage people entering Singapore daily using their own vehicles, to opt instead, for public transport," he added.

Mohamed Khaled, who is also Permas assemblyman was commenting on Singapore's move to introduce the RRC as countervailing Malaysia's road charge of RM20 per entry imposed on cars entering Johor from Nov 1, last year.

He said he understood that many Malaysians working in Singapore generally entered the country using motorcycles and public transport instead of cars.

Thus, it did not have a significant impact, he noted. -- BERNAMA